Tuesday, April 23, 2013

T is for Tolkien

I Love Sci-Fi/Fantasy Because...

...of J. R. R. Tolkien.

This one individual has probably inspired more creative writers, artists, musicians, filmmakers and dreamers than any other author. And perhaps most importantly, from my own narcissistic perspective, he inspired me.

J. R. R. Tolkien
Many call him the father of epic fantasy. I call him hero, for he saved me from an existence without magic.

He introduced me to the elves of Rivendell, the mines of Moria and magnificent eagles. I rode with the riders of Rohan, heard the shrill cries of Nazgûl and witnessed the wonder of wizards. He revealed the weaknesses of men and showed men rising to overcome them.

He escorted me through a world as vast and wonderful as any world can hope to be. And that world will forever be a part of me. If I could shake the hand of any author, I'd choose his.

In one way or another, directly or indirectly, J. R. R. Tolkien is why almost everyone loves science fiction and fantasy.

41 comments:

  1. This was a wonderful tribute to J.R.R. Tolkien! Your last sentence says it all.

    Julie

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  2. Tolkien.... such a great man! Without him we wouldn't have all the great fantasy books we have today.

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    1. Fantasy lovers are forever in his debt.

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  3. The world wouldn't be the same without Tolkien and the fantasy worlds he created :)

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  4. Master Tolkien, the god of epic fantasy. *Dragon bows deeply and offers prayer in his name.*

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    1. And I know that only to the greatest do dragons bow.

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  5. Tolkien has really defined fantasy as we see it today. That man was a genius!

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  6. Tolkien was the god of epic fantasy, a genius.

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    1. Others have done it well, but he did it first.

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  7. Agreed! Tolkien was/is an inspiration to all of us, although I would be hard pressed to say whether or not I feel more inspired by him or C.S. Lewis.
    Great post!

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    1. C. S. Lewis is also a great one, but Tolkien was my introduction.

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  8. One of my all time favorites. I'll never forget the first time I read The Hobbit and was just blown away. Now I get to share the experience with my daughters. It's still awesome!!

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  9. How very true, what a fantastic mind he must have had to invent all these species.

    JO ON FOOD, MY TRAVELS AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

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  10. For me, C.S. Lewis is my hero of fantasy, maybe because I read Narnia before LOTR. But since Lewis and Tolkien were critique partners (wouldn't you love to be fly on the wall of that pub?), Tolkien is also my hero. :)

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    1. I would pay money to have sat in on some of their discussions.

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  11. Replies
    1. Yes, he does. It's always great to see him appreciated.

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  12. Don't hate me...but I liked the movies way better than the books. I know, I know...I said that and almost got myself divorced!

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    1. LOL! I'm so glad the movies were made. Not only were they very well done, but they introduced at lot of people to his world that would have otherwise never known it.

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  13. Huh, what would the world be like if he had never written anything? I know others were pushing into the field (Lewis as someone mentioned above) but still, I don't think it would be the same without without him as a frontrunner.

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    1. Fantasy would definitely have taken a much different course.

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  14. Excellent (and well-deserved) tribute to Tolkien!

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  15. I remember being about ten years old and pretending to be hobbits with my sister, running around our home on mysterious 'adventures', leaving notes for imaginary allies giving them news of how the adventure in question was going and camping in blanket forts.
    Tolkien's universe was definitively a strong influence on our imagination, even when I didn't understand half of what was going on in the Silmarilon...

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    1. And *that* is the reason I appreciate him so much. He gave us life-long gifts.

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  16. Aha, Jeff,

    Oh no, another reminder about Tolkien. Yes, he really stayed in a pub named "The Quiet Woman" in Leek, England. Yes, some of his inspiration for "Middle-earth" was based on his observations of the locals. And yes, I live in Leek and understand what he was thinking. And yes, I fit in well.

    What the elf! I've got some elves who would love to meet you, Jeff!

    Gary :)

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    1. Then we are in debt to the pub and folk of Leek, England. Might they be the inspiration of Bree, I wonder? Should I be wary of the elves? :)

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  17. He sure is a total legend! I have to admit, though, that the only book of his I've read so far is The Hobbit. Some of the others are on my TBR shelf, but have been there for years!

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    1. There is a familiar yet different feel between them. Obviously, the lighthearted adventure takes a more serious turn.

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  18. A phenomenal writer if there ever was one. So glad someone picked him for T.

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    1. My choice for "T" was never in doubt. :-)

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  19. Ditto to everyone else's comments, Jeff. Tolkien ROCKS as do his awesome stories that are not only entertaining, but hold on to the hopeful belief that though there are always hard and difficult times, right will always prevail over evil in the end. I've enjoyed all your daily ABC subjects this month.

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    1. Unlike the Greeks of old, we tend to crave more positive ending to our tales these days. Tolkien was a master at providing a satisfactory ending.

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  20. Your T and my T are the same! I just finished rereading LoTR again, and I'm rereading, for the first time, all twelve books of Middle Earth. It's amazing how much Tolkien's words and themes and characters have absorbed and influenced me over the years.
    Rereading his earliest drafts for LoTR gives me hope that I can edit my novels into shape too!

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